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Research Papers

An Open Source Framework for Integrated Additive Manufacturing and Level-Set-Based Topology Optimization

[+] Author and Article Information
Panagiotis Vogiatzis

Computational Modeling,
Analysis and Design Optimization
Research Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
State University of New York at Stony Brook,
Stony Brook, NY 11794
e-mail: Panagiotis.Vogiatzis@stonybrook.edu

Shikui Chen

Computational Modeling,
Analysis and Design Optimization
Research Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
State University of New York at Stony Brook,
Stony Brook, NY 11794
e-mail: Shikui.Chen@stonybrook.edu

Chi Zhou

Department of Industrial
and Systems Engineering,
State University of New York at Buffalo,
Buffalo, NY 14260

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Computers and Information Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF COMPUTING AND INFORMATION SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING. Manuscript received March 13, 2016; final manuscript received August 18, 2017; published online September 8, 2017. Editor: Bahram Ravani.

J. Comput. Inf. Sci. Eng 17(4), 041012 (Sep 08, 2017) (10 pages) Paper No: JCISE-16-1887; doi: 10.1115/1.4037738 History: Received March 13, 2016; Revised August 18, 2017

Topology optimization has been considered as a promising tool for conceptual design due to its capability of generating innovative design candidates without depending on the designer's intuition and experience. Various optimization methods have been developed through the years, and one of the promising options is the level-set-based topology optimization method. The benefit of this alternative method is that the design is characterized by its clear boundaries. This advantage can avoid postprocessing work in conventional topology optimization process to a large extent and realize direct integration between topology optimization and additive manufacturing (AM). In this paper, practical algorithms and a matlab-based open source framework are developed to seamlessly integrate the level-set-based topology optimization procedure with AM process by converting the design to STereoLithography (STL) files, which is the de facto standard format for three-dimensional (3D) printing. The proposed algorithm and code are evaluated by a proof-of-concept demonstration with 3D printing of both single and multimaterial topology optimization results. The algorithm and the open source framework proposed in this paper will be beneficial to the areas of computational design and AM.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Two-dimensional geometry defined by a 3D level-set function Φ

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Fig. 2

Flipping in x direction for a design with n + 1 nodes

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Fig. 3

Symmetry in x direction for a design with n + 1 nodes

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Fig. 4

Periodicity in x direction for a design with n + 1 nodes

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Fig. 5

(a) Initial Φ and design and (b) final Φ and design

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Fig. 6

Two-dimensional design with default settings

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Fig. 7

Two-dimensional design with user-defined settings

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Fig. 8

(a) Two-dimensional design, (b) 3D design, (c) meshed surface, and (d) 3D printed

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Fig. 9

(a)–(d) Postprocessing in steps, (e) meshed surface, and (f) mesh detail

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Fig. 10

(a) Isosurface, (b) meshed surface, and (c) 3D printed

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Fig. 11

Before and after applying boundaries

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Fig. 12

Before and after smoothing Φ

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Fig. 13

(a) Initial design, (b) modified design, (c) 3D design, and (d) mesh generation

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Fig. 14

(a) Unit cell design, (b) 3 × 3 structure design, (c) separate design for each material, (d) meshed surface, and (e) 3D printed

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Fig. 15

Graphical user interface

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