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Research Papers

Identification of Similar and Complementary Subparts in B-Rep Mechanical Models

[+] Author and Article Information
Franca Giannini

Istituto di Matematica Applicata
e Tecnologie Informatiche,
“Enrico Magenes,” CNR,
Via De Marini 6,
Genova 16149, Italy
e-mail: franca.giannini@ge.imati.cnr.it

Katia Lupinetti

Istituto di Matematica Applicata
e Tecnologie Informatiche,
“Enrico Magenes,” CNR,
Via De Marini 6,
Genova 16149, Italy
e-mail: katia.lupinetti@ge.imati.cnr.it

Marina Monti

Istituto di Matematica Applicata
e Tecnologie Informatiche,
“Enrico Magenes,” CNR,
Via De Marini 6,
Genova 16149, Italy
e-mail: marina.monti@ge.imati.cnr.it

Contributed by the Design Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF COMPUTING AND INFORMATION SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING. Manuscript received September 9, 2015; final manuscript received February 7, 2017; published online May 16, 2017. Editor: Bahram Ravani.

J. Comput. Inf. Sci. Eng 17(4), 041004 (May 16, 2017) (11 pages) Paper No: JCISE-15-1281; doi: 10.1115/1.4036120 History: Received September 09, 2015; Revised February 07, 2017

Content-based retrieval is particularly important for exploiting company model databases and online catalogs. To allow the identification of reusable part models possibly fitting with the product under development, methods for the similarity assessment between shapes should be provided in terms of both global and partial shape matching. In this perspective, this paper proposes a method directly working on B-rep models for 3D model retrieval, which does not require any model conversion to triangular meshes and in addition to global and partial matching allows the identification of components that may likely be assembled with a given model.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Example of assessment of similarity for assembly: (a) query model, (b) globally similar, (c) partially similar to the circled subparts, and (d) mating shape

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Fig. 2

Summary of the geometric configurations of faces considered for the insertion of virtual arcs

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Fig. 3

Example of objects that can be discriminated by using virtual arcs: (a) object to be mated, (b) mating operation possible, (c) mating operation possible, and (d) mating operation not possible

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Fig. 4

Orientation examples, where dashed arrows represent the surface orientation and continuous arrows represent the face orientation: (a) concordant and (b) nonconcordant

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Fig. 5

Completeness examples: (a) complete and (b)noncomplete

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Fig. 6

Nonmanifold intersection: (a) example of nonmanifold intersection and (b) how to assign r orientation to a virtual edge

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Fig. 7

Relevant results for search for similar shape corresponding to different query models

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Fig. 8

Relevant results for search for complementary shape corresponding to different query models

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Fig. 9

The top-ranked results for the search for shapes similar to the whole query models

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Fig. 10

Precision and recall graph of the proposed method for partial retrieval

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Fig. 11

Precision–recall graph of the proposed method using global query model

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Fig. 12

Comparison between the proposed method and the You and Tsai method

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