The aerodynamic effects of trailing edge ejection on mixing losses downstream of cooled gas turbine blades were experimentally investigated and compared with an already existing one-dimensional theory by Schobeiri (1989). The significant parameters determining the mixing losses and therefore the efficiency of cooled blades are the ejection velocity ratio, the cooling mass flow ratio, the temperature ratio, the slot thickness ratio and the ejection flow angle. To cover a broad range of representative turbine blade geometry and flow deflections, a General Electric power generation gas turbine blade with high flow deflection and a NASA-turbine blade with intermediate flow deflection and different thickness distributions were experimentally investigated and compared with the existing theory. Comprehensive experimental investigations show that for the ejection velocity ratio μ = 1, the trailing edge ejection reduces the mixing losses downstream of the cooled gas turbine blade to a minimum which is in agreement with the theory. For the given cooling mass flow ratios that are dictated by the heat transfer requirements, optimum slot thickness to trailing edge thickness ratios are found, which correspond to the minimum mixing loss coefficients. The results allow the turbine aerodynamicist to minimize the mixing losses and to increase the efficiency of cooled gas turbine blades.

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