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research-article

Challenges and Status on Design and Computation for Emerging Additive Manufacturing Technologies

[+] Author and Article Information
Yuen-Shan Leung

Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, University of Southern California, USA
yuenshal@usc.edu

Tsz Ho Kwok

Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Aerospace Engineering, Concordia University, Canada
tom.thkwok@gmail.com

Xiangjia Li

Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, University of Southern California, USA
xiangjil@usc.edu

Yang Yang

Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, University of Southern California, USA
yang610@usc.edu

Charlie C.L. Wang

Department of Mechanical and Automation Engineering, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, P.R. China
c.c.wang@tudelft.nl

Yong Chen

Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, University of Southern California, USA
yongchen@usc.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4041913 History: Received May 07, 2018; Revised October 29, 2018

Abstract

The revolution of additive manufacturing (AM) has led to many opportunities in fabricating complex and novel products. The increase of the printable materials and the emergence of the various fabricating processes continuously expand the capability of manufacturing. Our products are no longer limited to be single material, single scale or single function. In fact, a paradigm shift is taking place in the industries from geometry-centered usage to support functional demands, and hence it is expected to resolve wide range of complex and difficult problems. Although AM provides us higher design degree of freedom beyond the geometry to fabricate new objects with tailored properties and functions, there are only very few approaches for computational design in this new domain enabled by AM. The objectives of this study are to provide an overview on the current computer-aided design methodologies that are applied to multi-material, multi-scale, multi-form and multi-functional AM technologies. We summarize the difficulties encountered in the design approaches and emphasize the need for the future development. The study also introduces the related manufacturing processes, lists their present applications, and discusses their potential future trends.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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