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Research Papers

Bio-Inspired Design and Iterative Feedback Tuning Control of a Wearable Ankle Rehabilitation Robot

[+] Author and Article Information
Liang Zhou

Wuhan University of Technology,
Wuhan 430070, China
e-mail: zhouliang_whut@163.com

Wei Meng

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
The University of Auckland,
Auckland 1010, New Zealand;
School of Information Engineering,
Wuhan University of Technology,
Wuhan 430070, China
e-mail: wmen386@aucklanduni.ac.nz; weimeng@whut.edu.cn

Charles Z. Lu

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
The University of Auckland,
Auckland 1010, New Zealand
e-mail: zlu013@aucklanduni.ac.nz

Quan Liu

School of Information Engineering,
Wuhan University of Technology,
Wuhan 430070, China
e-mail: quanliu@whut.edu.cn

Qingsong Ai

School of Information Engineering,
Wuhan University of Technology,
Wuhan 430070, China
e-mail: qingsongai@whut.edu.cn

Sheng Q. Xie

Mem. ASME
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
The University of Auckland,
Auckland 1010, New Zealand
e-mail: s.xie@auckland.ac.nz

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Computers and Information Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF COMPUTING AND INFORMATION SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING. Manuscript received January 29, 2016; final manuscript received June 9, 2016; published online November 7, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Giorgio Colombo.

J. Comput. Inf. Sci. Eng 16(4), 041003 (Nov 07, 2016) (9 pages) Paper No: JCISE-16-1049; doi: 10.1115/1.4033900 History: Received January 29, 2016; Revised June 09, 2016

Robotic rehabilitation for ankle injuries offers several advantages in terms of precision, force accuracy, and task-specific training. While the existing platform-based ankle rehabilitation robots tend to provide a rotation center that does not coincide with the actual ankle joint. In this paper, a novel bio-inspired ankle rehabilitation robot was designed, which is wearable and can keep the participant's shank be stationary. The robot is redundantly actuated by four motors in parallel to offer three ankle rotation degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) with sufficient range of motion (ROM) and force capacity. To control the robotic rehabilitation device operated in a repetitive trajectory training manner, a model-free robust control method in form of iterative feedback tuning (IFT) is proposed to tune the robot controller parameters. Experiments were performed on the parallel ankle rehabilitation platform to investigate the efficacy of the design and the robustness of the IFT technique under real-life rehabilitation scenarios.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Rotational motions of the human ankle joint

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Fig. 2

Model of the developed ankle rehabilitation robot

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Fig. 3

Kinematic description of the designed robot

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Fig. 4

IFT process diagram

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Fig. 5

Experiment setup: (a) prototype of the ankle rehabilitation robot and (b) control system hardware

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Fig. 6

Control structure of IFT method on the robot

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Fig. 7

Baseline PD control results of the ankle robot: (a) desired and measured end-effector orientation and (b) position tracking error of each actuator in joint space

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Fig. 8

IFT control results of the ankle robot: (a) desired and measured end-effector orientation at iteration 10 and (b) position tracking error of each actuator in joint space

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Fig. 9

IFT controller tuning process: (a) decrease of cost function for each actuator during the ten IFT iterations and (b) tuning of KP parameter for each actuator

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