0
Research Papers: SPECIAL SECTION PAPERS

Evaluating Industrial Products in an Innovative Visual-Olfactory Environment

[+] Author and Article Information
Monica Bordegoni

Mem. ASME
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Politecnico di Milano,
Milan 20156, Italy
e-mail: monica.bordegoni@polimi.it

Marina Carulli

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Politecnico di Milano,
Milan 20156, Italy
e-mail: marina.carulli@polimi.it

Contributed by the Computers and Information Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF COMPUTING AND INFORMATION SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING. Manuscript received January 10, 2016; final manuscript received March 16, 2016; published online June 30, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Francesco Ferrise.

J. Comput. Inf. Sci. Eng 16(3), 030904 (Jun 30, 2016) (9 pages) Paper No: JCISE-16-1012; doi: 10.1115/1.4033229 History: Received January 10, 2016; Revised March 16, 2016

The sense of smell has a great importance in our daily life. Recently, smells have been used for marketing purposes for improving the people's mood and for communicating information about products as household cleaners and food. However, the scent design discipline can be used for creating a “scent identity” of these products not traditionally associated to a specific smell, in order to communicate their features to customers. In the area of virtual reality (VR), several researches concerned the integration of smells in virtual environments. The research questions addressed in this paper concern if virtual prototypes (VP), including smell simulation, can be used for evaluating products as effectively as studies performed in real environments, and also if smells can enhance the users' sense of presence in virtual environments. For this purpose, a VR experimental framework including a prototype of a wearable olfactory display (wOD) has been set up, and experimental tests have been carried out.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2016 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

The prototype of the wOD

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Architecture of the wOD

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

The virtual environment including the 3D models of the washing machines and the background displayed to the subjects

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Average values of the subjects' evaluations of the question number 6 of the questionnaire about the level of presence

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Average values of the subjects' evaluations of the question number 10 of the questionnaire about the level of presence

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Average values of the subjects' evaluations of the question number 26 of the questionnaire about the level of presence

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Subjects while performing the testing session wearing a HMD and the wOD

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Average values of the subjects' evaluations of the question number 1 of the questionnaire about the level of presence

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Average values of the subjects' evaluations of the question number 1 of the questionnaire about the washing machines

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Average values of the subjects' evaluations of the question number 10 of the questionnaire about the washing machines

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Average values of the subjects' evaluations of the question number 13 of the questionnaire about the washing machines

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Average values of the subjects' evaluations of the question number 14 of the questionnaire about the washing machines

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In