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Research Papers: SPECIAL SECTION PAPERS

Visualization of Headlight Illumination for the Virtual Prototyping of Light-Based Driver–Assistance Systems

[+] Author and Article Information
Jan Berssenbrügge

Heinz Nixdorf Institute,
University of Paderborn,
Fürstenallee 11,
Paderborn 33102, Germany
e-mail: jan.berssenbruegge@hni.uni-paderborn.de

Ansgar Trächtler

Heinz Nixdorf Institute,
University of Paderborn,
Fürstenallee 11,
Paderborn 33102, Germany
e-mail: ansgar.traechtler@hni.uni-paderborn.de

Christoph Schmidt

Varroc Lighting Systems GmbH,
Toyota-Allee 7,
Köln-Marsdorf 50585, Germany
e-mail: cschmi27@varroclighting.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Computers and Information Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF COMPUTING AND INFORMATION SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING. Manuscript received December 22, 2015; final manuscript received March 16, 2016; published online June 30, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Francesco Ferrise.

J. Comput. Inf. Sci. Eng 16(3), 030901 (Jun 30, 2016) (7 pages) Paper No: JCISE-15-1429; doi: 10.1115/1.4033228 History: Received December 22, 2015; Revised March 16, 2016

Driving simulators that are capable of simulating a virtual drive at night are increasingly used for the virtual prototyping of light-based driver–assistance systems (DAS). Here, the interplay between driver and assistance system, which enhances the illumination of the road ahead of the vehicle, is investigated. For such investigations, special driving simulators are applied that not only enable a standard driving simulation but also cover the special requirements for the visualization of a driving scenery at night, the simulation of automotive headlights during a virtual drive at night, and the interface to a headlight control module (HCM) that operates the physical headlight prototypes. In this paper, we present the visualization system of the reconfigurable driving simulator from the research project TRAFFIS. We describe the special application focus on the virtual prototyping of a light-based DAS from our project partner Varroc Lighting Systems. The light-based DAS is based on a headlight prototype that combines a glare-free high-beam (GFHB) function and a predictive adaptive frontlighting system (PAFS) for glare-free driving with maximized headlight time.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Beam pattern (right) represents a cross-cut through the light cone and defines the full lighting characteristics of an automotive headlight (Source: Hella)

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Fig. 2

Detail preservation with global (left) and local (right) tone mapping applied in HDR rendering techniques for visualizing the illumination of the road ahead caused by the vehicle headlights (Source: Heinz Nixdorf Institute)

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Fig. 3

A combination of basic beam patterns (L-shape and flat-beam) generates an adaptive shadow area, which is positioned by swiveling and tilting the light modules within the headlight units (Source: Varroc Lighting Systems)

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Fig. 4

Logical architecture of a headlight with vertically and horizontally adjustable light modules providing GFHB and PAFS functions (Source: Varroc Lighting Systems)

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Fig. 5

Physical headlight prototype with vertically and horizontally adjustable light modules providing GFHB and PAFS functions (Source: Varroc Lighting Systems)

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Fig. 6

Center section of the virtual test track “Eifel” resulting from an automatic generation procedure according to Refs. [13] and [14] (left) and procedurally enriched with authentic vegetation according to Ref. [15] (right) (Source: Heinz Nixdorf Institute)

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Fig. 7

Reduced visibility along the road due to procedurally generated authentic vegetation according to Ref. [15] (Source: Heinz Nixdorf Institute)

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Fig. 8

Custom tailoring hardware components and software models into application-specific driving simulator configurations (Source: Heinz Nixdorf Institute)

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Fig. 9

Curved projection system in the TRAFFIS driving simulator for the visual simulation of test drives (Source: Heinz Nixdorf Institute)

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Fig. 10

Rear view and side view mirrors in the TRAFFIS simulator enhance the view backward and facilitate passing maneuvers (Source: Heinz Nixdorf Institute)

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Fig. 11

DIL setup for prototyping of light-based ADAS ECU in the TRAFFIS driving simulator (Source: Heinz Nixdorf Institute)

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Fig. 12

Visualization of glare-free driving at night: GFHB headlights are adjusted by the control algorithm in the HCM, which masks oncoming traffic with an adaptive shadow area in the beam pattern of the headlights to avoid glare and maximize high-beam time (Source: Heinz Nixdorf Institute and Varroc Lighting Systems)

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Fig. 13

Visualization of a U-shape marking detected vehicles and of the corresponding shadow area for glare-free driving with maximized high-beam time facilitating the fine-tuning of the adjustment of the headlights onto oncoming or preceding traffic (Source: Heinz Nixdorf Institute)

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