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Research Papers

An Ontology and Integration Framework for Smart Communities

[+] Author and Article Information
Shishir Kinkar

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering,
Carnegie Mellon University,
NASA Ames Research Park,
Bldg. 23 (MS 23-11), P.O. Box 1,
Moffett Field, CA 94035-0001
e-mail: shishir.kinkar@sv.cmu.edu

Mark Hennessy

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering,
Carnegie Mellon University,
Freischuetzstr. 106,
2. OG, bei Wolkowa,
Munich 81927, Germany
e-mail: mhennessy116@gmail.com

Steven Ray

Mem. ASME
Silicon Valley Campus,
Carnegie Mellon University,
NASA Ames Research Park,
Bldg. 23 (MS 23-11), P.O. Box 1,
Moffett Field, CA 94035-0001
e-mail: steve.ray@sv.cmu.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Design Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF COMPUTING AND INFORMATION SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING. Manuscript received September 5, 2014; final manuscript received November 3, 2015; published online January 13, 2016. Editor: Bahram Ravani.

J. Comput. Inf. Sci. Eng 16(1), 011003 (Jan 13, 2016) (7 pages) Paper No: JCISE-14-1270; doi: 10.1115/1.4032218 History: Received September 05, 2014; Revised November 03, 2015

This paper describes our work concerning the definition of a neutral, abstract ontology, and framework that supports the vision and diverse contexts of a smart community. This framework is composed of a general, core ontology that supports what many are calling the Internet of Things (IoT), a scalable number of extension ontologies to describe various application perspectives, and a mapping methodology to relate external data and/or schemas to our ontology. Finally, we show why this ontology is scalable and generic enough to support a wide range of smart devices, systems, and people.

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Copyright © 2016 by ASME
Topics: Ontologies
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Smart Community ontology components: Resource, Event, Service, and Location

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Fig. 2

Some subclasses of resource, and part of the measurement model

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Fig. 3

The CMUSV ontology components

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Fig. 4

Some extensions introduced by the OpenReferral context, shown at lower right

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Fig. 5

Overview of ontology generation and mapping

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Fig. 6

Properties and constraints generated from JSON

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Fig. 7

Mapping the generated JSON Ontology to the smart community ontology

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Fig. 8

Example of an input model that makes different modeling choices

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Fig. 9

SPIN rule for identifying and creating device types as subclasses

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Fig. 10

Class hierarchy before and after running the reasoner

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