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Research Papers

Contact and Mobility Simulation for Mechanical Assemblies Based on Skin Model Shapes

[+] Author and Article Information
Benjamin Schleich

Chair of Engineering Design,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg,
Erlangen 91058, Germany
e-mail: schleich@mfk.fau.de

Nabil Anwer

Automated Production Research Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
ENS Cachan,
Cachan 94230, France

Luc Mathieu

Automated Production Research Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
ENS Cachan,
Cachan 94230, France

Sandro Wartzack

Chair of Engineering Design,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg,
Erlangen 91058, Germany

Contributed by the Computers and Information Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF COMPUTING AND INFORMATION SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING. Manuscript received September 29, 2014; final manuscript received October 25, 2014; published online April 8, 2015. Editor: Bahram Ravani.

J. Comput. Inf. Sci. Eng 15(2), 021009 (Jun 01, 2015) (7 pages) Paper No: JCISE-14-1306; doi: 10.1115/1.4029051 History: Received September 29, 2014; Revised October 25, 2014; Online April 08, 2015

Assembly modeling as one of the most important steps in the product development activity relies more and more on the extensive use of computer-aided design (cad) systems. The modeling of geometric interfaces between the components of the assembly is of central importance in the simulation of mechanical assemblies. Over the past decades, many researchers have devoted their efforts to establish theories and systems covering assembly modeling. Although the product form or shape has been extensively investigated considering the nominal cad geometry, inevitable limitations can be reported. Computer aided tolerancing (CAT) systems provide simulation tools for modeling the effects of tolerances on the assembly but still lack of form deviation considerations. The skin model concept which stemmed from the theoretical foundations of geometrical product specification and verification (GPS) has been developed to enrich the nominal geometry considering realistic physical shapes. However, the digital representation of the skin model has been investigated only recently. This paper presents a novel approach for a skin model based simulation of contact and mobility for assemblies. Three important issues are addressed: the geometric modeling of the contact, the contact quality evaluation, and the motion analysis. The main contribution to CAT can be found in the analysis of the effects of geometric form deviations on the assembly and motion behavior of solid mechanics, which comprises models for the assembly simulation, for the contact quality evaluation, and for the motion analysis. A case study is presented to illustrate the proposed approaches.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

The difference between the nominal model, the skin model, and the concept of skin model shapes

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Fig. 2

Simulation framework

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Fig. 3

The relative positioning framework following [15]

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Fig. 4

The objective functions for the minimization (a) fHull (⋅), (b) fEuclid (⋅), (c) fW-Assembly (⋅), (d) fW-Normal (⋅)

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Fig. 5

Results of the assembly simulation for two exemplary point clouds (a) fHull (⋅), (b) fEuclid (⋅), (c) fW-Assembly (⋅), (d) fW-Normal (⋅), (e) fW-Assembly (⋅) (con.), and (f) fW-Normal (⋅) (con.)

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Fig. 6

Histogram of the signed weighted distance for different objective functions

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Fig. 7

Adaption of the initial part position for discrete time steps (a) initial position in x-direction for t0 and (b) initial position in x-direction for ti

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Fig. 8

Slider mechanism (a) mesh representation and (b) point cloud representation

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Fig. 9

Partitioning of the skin model shapes for the assembly modeling (a) skin model shapes of the block and the clip and (b) Partitioning of the skin model shapes

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Fig. 10

Trajectories of skin model shapes of the slider mechanism

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