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Research Papers

Integrated, Synchronous Multi-User Design and Analysis

[+] Author and Article Information
Jared C. Briggs

Intellect Engineering,
Payson, Utah, 84651
e-mail: jared.briggs@intellecteng.com

Ammon I. Hepworth

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Brigham Young University,
Provo, Utah, 84602
e-mail: ammon.hepworth@byu.edu

Brett R. Stone

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Brigham Young University,
Provo, Utah, 84602
e-mail: brett_stone@me.com

Josh Q. Coburn

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Brigham Young University,
Provo, Utah, 84602
e-mail: jqcoburn@gmail.com

C. Greg Jensen

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Brigham Young University,
Provo, Utah, 84602
e-mail: cjensen@byu.edu

Ed Red

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Brigham Young University,
Provo, Utah, 84602
e-mail: ered@byu.edu

Siemens is a registered trademark of Siemens AG.

NX is a trademark of Siemens Product Lifecycle Management Software, Inc.

CUBIT is a trademark of Sandia National Laboratories.

CATIA is a registered trademark of Dassault Systémes.

Inventor is a registered trademark of Autodesk, Inc.

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Design Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF COMPUTING AND INFORMATION SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING. Manuscript received April 3, 2014; final manuscript received February 9, 2015; published online April 9, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Joshua D. Summers.

J. Comput. Inf. Sci. Eng 15(3), 031002 (Sep 01, 2015) (11 pages) Paper No: JCISE-14-1113; doi: 10.1115/1.4029801 History: Received April 03, 2014; Revised February 09, 2015; Online April 09, 2015

An integrated multi-user system for synchronous design and analysis improves collaboration and concurrent engineering across multiple engineering disciplines. This approach allows all members of a multidisciplinary team (i.e., a team made up of designers and structural analysts) to access the same shared model over a computer network and synchronously contribute to the model in real-time. Data for both design and analysis are directly based on the same mathematical representation of the geometry, eliminating the need for model translation between disciplines. All data are stored on a central server which allows simultaneous access by multiple users. Each user views and operates on the model in a way specific to his or her discipline. Updates to the shared model are seen in real-time. This system enables an enhanced parallel product development workflow, since users from multiple disciplines can simultaneously contribute to the same engineering model. A simple implementation of an integrated multi-user design and analysis system was developed to demonstrate this method. Preliminary results from two experiments suggest a reduction in the amount of time required to perform design and analysis operations when compared with traditional, single-user approaches. Future research is suggested.

Copyright © 2015 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Thick client–server architecture for NXConnect [14]

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Fig. 2

The gap in multi-user design and analysis research

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Fig. 3

High-level overview of common-geometry modeling architecture

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Fig. 4

Loads on geometry (before modification)

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Fig. 5

Loads on geometry (after modification)

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Fig. 6

An example NURBS surface

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Fig. 7

NURBS surface decomposed into Bézier patches

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Fig. 8

Discipline-specific views based on the shared model

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Fig. 9

Example of a designer’s view of a model

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Fig. 10

Example of an analyst’s view of a model

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Fig. 11

An example client dataflow

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Fig. 12

A designer’s view

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Fig. 13

An analyst’s view

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Fig. 14

Wing design and analysis; flat plate (top), modeled wing (middle), wing with boundary conditions, and loads applied (bottom)

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Fig. 15

Pressure vessel design and analysis; flat plate (top), pressure vessel modeled (middle), and pressure vessel with boundary conditions and loads applied (bottom)

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Fig. 16

Time results (averages) for each test type performed with the wing section test

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Fig. 17

Time results (averages) for each test type performed with the pressure vessel test

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