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Research Papers

A Sensitivity Approach for Eliminating Clashes From Computer Aided Design Model Assemblies

[+] Author and Article Information
Mohammad Shaheer Zubairi

School of Mechanical
and Aerospace Engineering,
Queen’s University Belfast,
Belfast BT9 5AH, UK
e-mail: mzubairi01@qub.ac.uk

Trevor T. Robinson

Lecturer
School of Mechanical
and Aerospace Engineering,
Queen’s University Belfast,
Belfast BT9 5AH, UK
e-mail: t.robinson@qub.ac.uk

Cecil G. Armstrong

Professor
School of Mechanical
and Aerospace Engineering,
Queen’s University Belfast,
Belfast BT9 5AH, UK
e-mail: c.armstrong@qub.ac.uk

Danielle S. Soban

Lecturer
School of Mechanical
and Aerospace Engineering,
Queen’s University Belfast,
Belfast BT9 5AH, UK
e-mail: d.soban@qub.ac.uk

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Computers and Information Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF COMPUTING AND INFORMATION SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING. Manuscript received September 20, 2013; final manuscript received March 20, 2014; published online April 28, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Charlie C. L. Wang.

J. Comput. Inf. Sci. Eng 14(3), 031002 (Apr 28, 2014) (9 pages) Paper No: JCISE-13-1184; doi: 10.1115/1.4027345 History: Received September 20, 2013; Revised March 20, 2014

Clashes occur when components in an assembly unintentionally violate others. If clashes are not identified and designed out before manufacture, product function will be reduced or substantial cost will be incurred in rework. This paper introduces a novel approach for eliminating clashes by identifying which parameters defining the part features in a computer aided design (CAD) assembly need to change and by how much. Sensitivities are calculated for each parameter defining the part and the assembly as the change in clash volume due to a change in each parameter value. These sensitivities give an indication of important parameters and are used to predict the optimum combination of changes in each parameter to eliminate the clash. Consideration is given to the fact that it is sometimes preferable to modify some components in an assembly rather than others and that some components in an assembly cannot be modified as the designer does not have control over their shape. Successful elimination of clashes has been demonstrated in a number of example assemblies.

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References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Fillet size on the limit of the size of the faces to which it is applied

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

(a) Clash between a shaft that is too large for a hole; (b) reduced clash because the hole position is outside the solid domain

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Housing and shaft assembly clash

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

(a) Crank shaft assembly; (b) clash between connecting rod and pin; (c) clashes between pin and piston

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