0
Research Papers

Real-Time Dynamics Simulation of Unmanned Sea Surface Vehicle for Virtual Environments

[+] Author and Article Information
Atul Thakur

Simulation-Based System Design Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering,  University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 e-mail: athakur@umd.edu

Satyandra K. Gupta1

Simulation-Based System Design Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering and The Institute for Systems Research,  University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 e-mail: skgupta@umd.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Comput. Inf. Sci. Eng 11(3), 031005 (Aug 10, 2011) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3617443 History: Received June 16, 2010; Revised November 13, 2010; Published August 10, 2011; Online August 10, 2011

The role of virtual environments (VEs) is crucial in efficient design and operation of unmanned vehicles. VEs are extensively used in operator training for tele-operation, planning using programming by demonstration, and hardware and software designs. VE for unmanned sea surface vehicles (USSV) requires a 6 degree of freedom dynamics simulation in the time domain. In order to be interactive, the VE requires real-time performance of the underlying dynamics simulator. In general, the dynamics simulation of USSVs involves the following four main operations: (1) computation of dynamic pressure head due to fluid flow around the hull under the ocean wave, (2) computation of wet surface, (3) computing the surface integral of the dynamic pressure head over the wet surface, and (4) solving the rigid body dynamics equation. The first three operations depend upon the boat geometry complexity and need to be performed at each time step, making the simulation run very slow. In this paper, we address the problem of physics preserving model simplification for real-time potential flow based simulator for a USSV in the time domain, with an arbitrary hull geometry. This paper reports model simplification algorithms based on clustering, temporal coherence, and hardware acceleration using parallel computing on multiple cores to obtain real time simulation performance for the developed VE.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

USSV Virtual Environment developed by Ref. [2]

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Inertial and body coordinate system

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

USSV model simplification by removing facets that never come in contact with water. (a) 3D model for USSV. (b) Simplified USSV model.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Variation of average force error and computation time with cluster count C. (a) Variation of average force error with cluster count C. (b) Variation of average computation time with cluster count C.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Variation of computation time with number of threads

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Variation of average error and average computation time with tolerance. (1500 time steps, C = 45, and ɛ = 10−3 ). (a) Variation of average force error with tolerance. (b) Variation of average computation time with tolerance.

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In