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Research Papers

An Analysis of Description Logic Augmented with Domain Rules for the Development of Product Models

[+] Author and Article Information
Xenia Fiorentini

Manufacturing Systems Integration Division, Design Process Group, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899xenia.fiorentini@nist.gov

Sudarsan Rachuri

Manufacturing Systems Integration Division, Design Process Group, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899rachuri.sudarsan@nist.gov

Hyowon Suh

Manufacturing Systems Integration Division, Design Process Group, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899hyowon.suh@nist.gov

Jaehyun Lee

Manufacturing Systems Integration Division, Design Process Group, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899lee.jaehyun@nist.gov

Ram D. Sriram

Manufacturing Systems Integration Division, Design Process Group, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899ram.sriram@nist.gov

J. Comput. Inf. Sci. Eng 10(2), 021008 (Jun 08, 2010) (13 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3385794 History: Received November 05, 2008; Revised February 08, 2010; Published June 08, 2010; Online June 08, 2010

The languages and logical formalisms developed by information scientists and logicians concentrate on the theory of languages and logical theorem proving. These languages, when used by domain experts to represent their domain of discourse, most often have issues related to the level of expressiveness and need specific extensions. In this paper, we first analyze the requirements for the development of structured knowledge representation models for manufacturing products. We then explore how these requirements can be satisfied through the levels of logical formalisms and expressivity of a structured knowledge representation model. We report our analysis of description logic (DL) and domain-specific rules with respect to the requirements by giving an example of a product ontology developed with ontology web language-description logic (OWL) and augmented with semantic web rule language (SWRL) rules. Clearly, increasing the expressivity of a product ontology also improves that of domain-specific rules, but there exits the usual tradeoff between the expressivity of languages and the complexity of their reasoning tasks. We present a case study of an electromechanical product to validate the analysis and further show how the OWL-DL reasoner together with the rule engine can enable reasoning about the product ontology. We finally discuss the open issues such as capabilities and limitations related to the usage of DL, OWL, and SWRL for product modeling.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Connection between the OWL ontology and SWRL rules

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Figure 2

Core product model, OWL version (highlighting is-a and part-of relationships)

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Figure 3

Open assembly model, OWL version (highlighting is-a relationship)

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Figure 4

Example of a case where rules are needed

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Figure 5

CPM and OAM for representing assembly structure

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Figure 6

Example of a property rule

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Figure 7

Example of an association rule

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Figure 8

Example of a partOf rule

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Figure 9

Example of an acyclic rule

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Figure 10

Case study: planetary gear system

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Figure 11

Example of a property hierarchy system

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