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Research Papers

Process Signature Modeling for Tolerance Analysis

[+] Author and Article Information
R. Ascione

Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Università degli Studi di Cassino, via G. Di Biasio 43, 03043 Cassino, Italy

W. Polini1

Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Università degli Studi di Cassino, via G. Di Biasio 43, 03043 Cassino, Italypolini@unicas.it

Q. Semeraro

Dipartimento di Meccanica, Politecnico di Milano, via La Masa 1, 20153 Milano, Italy

1

Corresponding author.

J. Comput. Inf. Sci. Eng 10(2), 021006 (Jun 03, 2010) (13 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3402641 History: Received December 30, 2008; Revised October 04, 2009; Published June 03, 2010; Online June 03, 2010

Many well-known approaches exist in the literature for tolerance analysis. All the methods proposed in the literature consider the dimensional and the geometric tolerances applied to some critical points (contact points among profiles belonging to couples of parts) on the surface of the assembly components. These points are generally considered uncorrelated since the nominal surface is considered. Therefore, the methods proposed in the literature do not consider the actual surface due to a manufacturing process. Every manufacturing process leaves on the surface a signature, i.e., a systematic pattern that characterizes all the features machined with that process. The aim of the present work is to investigate the effects of considering the manufacturing signature in solving a tolerance stack-up function. A case study involving three parts has been defined and solved by means of a method of the literature, the variational method, with and without considering the correlation among the points of the same surface due to the manufacturing signature. This work represents a first step toward the integration of the design and the manufacturing in a concurrent engineering approach.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 2

Features of the parts

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Figure 4

Local and global DRFs

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Figure 5

Translations and rotations of an element due to the applied tolerances

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Figure 6

The evaluated profile due to the manufacturing signature versus the nominal (perfect) circular profile

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Figure 7

A bilobe profile due to a turning process

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Figure 8

The angles among the reactions and the normal vectors

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Figure 9

Graphical representation of the trend of β1 and β2 versus α1

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Figure 10

Graphical representation of the trend of β3 versus α1and α2

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Figure 11

Graphical representation of the obtained values of Δg versus α1 and α2 in the range 0–2π

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Figure 12

A trilobe profile due to a turning process

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Figure 13

Forces system of the case study

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Figure 14

Possible position of the first profile versus α1

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Figure 15

Graphical representation of the trend of β1, β2, and β3 versus α1

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Figure 16

Graphical representation of the obtained values of Δg versus α1 and α2 in the range 0–2π/3

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Figure 17

Graphical representation of the obtained values of Δg versus α1 and α2 in the range 0–2π

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