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Research Papers

Evaluating the Use of Digital Product Repositories to Enhance Product Dissection Activities in the Classroom

[+] Author and Article Information
Matt Devendorf

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo, 5 Norton Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260mdd7@buffalo.edu

Kemper Lewis2

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo, 5 Norton Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260kelewis@buffalo.edu

Timothy W. Simpson

Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Penn State University, 314D Leonhard Building, University Park, PA 16802tws8@psu.edu

Robert B. Stone

School of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Oregon State University, 406 Rogers Hall, Corvalllis, OR 97331rob.stone@oregonstate.edu

William C. Regli

Department of Computer Science, Drexel University, 3201 Arch Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104regli@drexel.edu

http://www.nsdl.org

http://www.needs.org

http://gforge.org

http://subversion.tigris.org

http://www.mediawiki.org

http://gicl.cs.drexel.edu/wiki/CIBER-U

http://gicl.cs.drexel.edu/wiki/Teaching_Resources

http://gicl.cs.drexel.edu/wiki/Bicycle

http://gicl.cs.drexel.edu/wiki/Briggs_Stratton_Engine

http://cms.psu.edu

http://gicl.cs.drexel.edu/wiki/University_at_Buffalo:_MAE_277_Pages

http://gicl.cs.drexel.edu/wiki/Template_for_UB_MAE_277_Class

2

Corresponding author.

J. Comput. Inf. Sci. Eng 9(4), 041008 (Nov 24, 2009) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3264574 History: Received August 13, 2007; Revised February 25, 2009; Published November 24, 2009; Online November 24, 2009

Product dissection has been used successfully in a variety of ways to actively engage students in their learning; however, using product dissection in the classroom does have drawbacks: products, tools, and their upkeep can be costly, workspace and storage space can be difficult to obtain, and even the best crafted dissection assignments can end in chaos. Recent cyberinfrastructure initiatives seek to create ubiquitous, comprehensive, interactive, and functionally complete digital environments for research communities that consist of people, data, information, tools, and instruments. With product dissection as our unifying theme, we are applying cyberinfrastructure tools and technologies to undergraduate engineering education and assessing the impact of these tools on student learning. Specifically, the project combines product dissection activities at three universities with two digital design repositories CAD modeling and animation, video, and MediaWiki technology to enable cyberinfrastructure-based product dissection activities. Lessons learned from these efforts are presented from the students’ perspectives as well as that of the faculties in both engineering and computer science. The implications for implementing the developments on a national scale are discussed along with ongoing research.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

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Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

MEDIAWIKI student report pages for: (a) Kodak one-time-use camera, and (b) Black and Decker drill

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