0
Research Papers

Design for Manufacturing of Sculptured Surfaces: A Computational Platform

[+] Author and Article Information
Ahmad Barari

Faculty of Engineering & Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario, Canada L1H 7K4ahmad.barari@uoit.ca

Hoda A. ElMaraghy1

Intelligent Manufacturing Systems Centre, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada N9B 3P4hae@uwindsor.ca

Waguih H. ElMaraghy

Intelligent Manufacturing Systems Centre, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada N9B 3P4wem@uwindsor.ca

1

Corresponding author.

J. Comput. Inf. Sci. Eng 9(2), 021006 (Jun 04, 2009) (13 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3130143 History: Received December 01, 2006; Revised January 27, 2009; Published June 04, 2009

This paper presents a computer aided design for machining (DFMc) platform that enables designers to customize the design for the available machine tools and to estimate the effect of design decisions on the accuracy of the final machined products, particularly those containing sculptured surfaces. The platform contains two modules to model and simulate the actual machined surface and to evaluate the resulting minimum deviation zone compared to the desired geometry. In the first module, based on the configuration of the available machine tool and the limitations imposed by its inherent errors, the machined surface is simulated and presented as a nonuniform rational B-spline (NURBS) surface. In the second module, the minimum deviation zone between the actual and the nominal NURBS surfaces is evaluated when the developed method to do this task efficiently improves the convergence of the resulting optimization process. Utilizing this platform, two different applications are developed; design tolerance allocation based on the minimum deviation zone of the machined surface and adaptation of the nominal design to compensate for the effect of machining errors. Employing these applications during the design stage improves the acceptance rate of the produced parts and reduces the rate of scrap and rework. The DFMc platform and its presented applications can be implemented in any integrated computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system. The presented methods can be applied to any type of input geometries and are particularly efficient for design and manufacturing of precise components with complex surfaces. Products in this group, such as dies and tools, medical instruments, and biomedical implants, mostly have critical and important functionalities that demand very careful design and manufacturing decisions.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Nominal, G, actual, G′, and the substitute, G″, of a planar curve and the deviations of four sample points with respect to the substitute geometry

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Nominal, actual, and the best substitute of a planar curve and the minimum deviation zone based on the four sample points

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Nominal, actual, and the substitute control net of a planar curve and the associated deviations of control points

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

A control net with 36 control points is used to generate a third degree uniform nonperiodic NURB surface

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

The deviation zone between the nominal surface and the machined surface by applying the machining error operator resulted from the calibration data of the vertical machine center in the Appendix

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

The deviation zone between the substitute surface found by the optimization with an arbitrary initial condition and the machined surface generated by applying the machining error operator of the vertical machine in the Appendix.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

The deviation zone between the optimum substitute surface and the machined surface by applying the machining error operator for the calibration data of the vertical machine in the Appendix

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Nominal, actual, and the optimum substitute geometry of a planar curve and the corresponding optimum compensating geometry.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

The core part of a die for production of the case of a bank machine; the profile tolerance zone of the sculptured surface is defined based on the two data references A and B

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

The deviation zone between the optimum substitute surface and the machined surface generated by applying the machining error operator of the vertical machine in the Appendix. The observed extreme deviation is larger than the acceptable profile tolerance.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Machining of compensating geometry. The deviation zone between the optimum substitute surface and the surface resulting from applying the machining error operator of the vertical machine in the Appendix is compensated.

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In