0
Research Papers

Generating Simplified Trapping Probability Models From Simulation of Optical Tweezers System

[+] Author and Article Information
Ashis Gopal Banerjee

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Institute for Systems Research, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742

Arvind Balijepalli

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Institute for Systems Research, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742; Precision Engineering Division, Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899

Satyandra K. Gupta1

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Institute for Systems Research, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742skgupta@umd.edu

Thomas W. LeBrun

Precision Engineering Division, Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899

Certain commerical entitites, equipment, or materials may be identified in this document in order to describe an experimental procedure or concept adequately. Such identification is not intended to imply recommendation or endorsement by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, nor is it intended to imply that the entities, materials, or equipment are necessarily the best available for the purpose.

1

Corresponding author.

J. Comput. Inf. Sci. Eng 9(2), 021003 (May 20, 2009) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3130784 History: Received November 28, 2007; Revised September 05, 2008; Published May 20, 2009

This paper presents a radial basis function based approach to generate simplified models to estimate the trapping probability in optical trapping experiments using offline simulations. The difference form of Langevin’s equation is used to perform physically accurate simulations of a particle under the influence of a trapping potential and is used to estimate trapping probabilities at discrete points in the parameter space. Gaussian radial basis functions combined with kd-tree based partitioning of the parameter space are then used to generate simplified models of trapping probability. We show that the proposed approach is computationally efficient in estimating the trapping probability and that the estimated probability using the simplified models is sufficiently close to the probability estimates from offline simulation data.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Schematic illustration of simulation setup

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Axial and transverse force components when sphere center is displaced along the laser beam axis from the focus

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Axial and transverse force components when sphere center is displaced along the transverse axis from the laser beam focus

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Trajectory of sphere that is trapped by a stationary laser beam

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Estimated trapping probability contours for a 7.5 μm radius sphere under the influence of a stationary laser beam

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Estimated trapping probability contours for a 7.5 μm radius sphere in the Y-Z-plane under the influence of a laser beam moving along the +Y-axis with a speed of 0.352 μm/ms

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Estimated trapping probability contours for a 7.5 μm radius sphere in the X-Y-plane under the influence of a laser beam moving along the +Y-axis with a speed of 0.352 μm/ms

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Estimated trapping probability contours for a 7.5 μm radius sphere in the Y-Z-plane under the influence of a laser beam moving along the −Z-axis with a speed of 0.176 μm/ms

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In