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Technical Briefs

Haptic Wrists: An Alternative Design Strategy Based on User Perception

[+] Author and Article Information
Javier Martín

Department of Applied Mechanics, Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Técnicas (CEIT), University of Navarra, Paseo Manuel Lardizábal 15, 20018, San Sebastian, Spain

Joan Savall, Iñaki Díaz, Josune Hernantes

Department of Applied Mechanics, Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Técnicas (CEIT) and Tecnun, University of Navarra, Paseo Manuel Lardizábal 13, 20018, San Sebastian, Spain

Diego Borro

Department of Applied Mechanics, Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Técnicas (CEIT) and Tecnun, University of Navarra, Paseo Manuel Lardizábal 13, 20018, San Sebastian, Spaindborro@ceit.es

Isometric devices are designed to display displacement variables and read back forces, so they have ideally infinite stiffness and stay put while force is exerted on them. Elastic/isotonic devices are designed to display forces and read position variables, thus they offer no significant resistance and are used to track users as they move within the virtual world (from Refs. 10-11).

The term “2D and half” has been used before (21) in a slightly different sense: the PenCat/Pro™ device is a planar five bar linkage, which allows a measured vertical movement of the pen, passively actuated by elastic return. “2.5DOF” is used in this paper for simplicity.

J. Comput. Inf. Sci. Eng 9(1), 014501 (Feb 20, 2009) (3 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3072899 History: Received August 31, 2007; Revised October 31, 2008; Published February 20, 2009

A new three degree-of-freedom (3DOF) torque feedback wrist is being developed to be added to an existing 3DOF force feedback haptic device. It is difficult to find a satisfactory solution to the mechanical design problem, mainly because of the required large rotational workspace and severe weight constraints. This work proposes an alternative design strategy based on user perception, which allows simplification of the mechanics. The proposed approach consists of substituting the last rotational DOF of the wrist with a pseudohaptic DOF. Thanks to specially designed visuotactile cues, the pseudohaptic DOF is integrated with the active DOF into the same device, being able to generate free motion and collision detection perception to the user. This approach provides for simpler kinematics, lightweight designs, lower inertias, and less friction, which are key advantages for the inclusion of torque feedback into force feedback devices.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Proposed 2.5DOF approach

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Tool-roll axis, free motion perception

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Tool-roll axis, collision perception

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