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Technical Briefs

Creation of Body Surfaces From Reverse-Engineered Components

[+] Author and Article Information
Gregory Lecrivain

Faculty of Science & Engineering, John Dalton Building, Manchester Metropolitan University, Chester Street, Manchester, M1 GD, UKg.lecrivain@mmu.ac.uk

Ian Kennedy

Faculty of Science & Engineering, John Dalton Building, Manchester Metropolitan University, Chester Street, Manchester, M1 GD, UKi.f.kennedy@mmu.ac.uk

Arezki Slaouti

Faculty of Science & Engineering, John Dalton Building, Manchester Metropolitan University, Chester Street, Manchester, M1 GD, UKa.slaouti@mmu.ac.uk

J. Comput. Inf. Sci. Eng 8(2), 024501 (Apr 30, 2008) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2906256 History: Received June 11, 2007; Revised January 21, 2008; Published April 30, 2008

In the automotive industry or in similar industries, body panels need to be perfectly smooth for visual and aerodynamic reasons. In some cases, the component is a hand-made body part that will require a suitable CAD model for further development and manufacturing. Such a smooth CAD model can only be produced through reverse-engineering and CAD procedures that will make use of accurate surface reconstruction. This paper describes a reverse-engineering procedure for the production of a suitable CAD mesh from which surface reconstruction can take place. It then analyzes and compares three approaches assessing the continuity and the quality of each set of NURBS patches: automatic, semiautomatic, and completely manual surfacing. Recommendations are made for each method when creating CAD surfaces. Finally, a procedure is suggested to optimize the time and the quality of the final CAD model.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 8

NURBS fitted to the mesh from a curve network with a five sided patch (a) and with four-sided patches (b)

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Figure 9

Comparisons of the different CAD models

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Figure 10

The deviation (mm) between the final surfaces and the mesh

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Figure 13

Zebra analysis tool applied to each model

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Figure 14

Deviation (mm) of the optimised surfaces and wireframe of corresponding patches

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Figure 12

Zoom of curvature comb of each model

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Figure 11

Curvature comb of each model

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Figure 1

Sports car TVR Cerbera and scanning equipment

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Figure 2

Example of a scan alignment of the wing

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Figure 3

Hole filling with a Bezier surface

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Figure 4

Polygonal mesh of the front wing

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Figure 5

Curvature comb of different levels of continuity

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Figure 6

A composite curve made of two cubic curve segments using the Bezier representation (a) and the Hermite representation (b). Tangent vectors are not displayed.

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