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Research Papers

Product Model Preparation and Processing for Micromanufacturing

[+] Author and Article Information
Chao-Yaug Liao

G-SCOP, Grenoble Institute of Technology, CNRS, UJF, 46 Avenue Félix Viallet, 38031 Grenoble Cedex, France; SPECTRO, CNRS,  UJF, Domaine Universitaire, 38402 Saint Martin d’Hères, France; Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University, 106 Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C.d89522030@ntu.edu.tw

Jean-Claude Léon

G-SCOP, Grenoble Institute of Technology, CNRS, UJF, 46 Avenue Félix Viallet, 38031 Grenoble Cedex, Francejean-claude.leon@inpg.fr

Cédric Masclet

G-SCOP, Grenoble Institute of Technology, CNRS, UJF, 46 Avenue Félix Viallet, 38031 Grenoble Cedex, Francecedric.masclet@hmg.inpg.fr

Michel Bouriau

SPECTRO, CNRS,  UJF, Domaine Universitaire, 38402 Saint Martin d’Hères, Francemichel.bouriau@ujf-grenoble.fr

Patrice L. Baldeck

SPECTRO, CNRS,  UJF, Domaine Universitaire, 38402 Saint Martin d’Hères, Francepatrice.baldeck@ujf-grenoble.fr

Tien-Tung Chung

Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University, 106 Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C.ttchung@ntu.edu.tw

J. Comput. Inf. Sci. Eng 8(2), 021004 (Apr 30, 2008) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2904939 History: Received October 20, 2006; Revised January 07, 2008; Published April 30, 2008

Based on the two-photon polymerization technique, an analysis of product shapes is performed so that their digital manufacturing models can be efficiently processed for micromanufacture. To describe microstructures, this analysis shows that nonmanifold models are of interest. These models can be intuitively understood as combinations of wires, surfaces, and volumes. Minimum acceptable wall thickness, wire dimension, and laser density of energy are among the elements justifying this category of models. Taking into account this requirement, a model preparation and processing scheme is proposed that widens the laser beam trajectories with a concept of extended layer manufacturing technique. A tessellation process suited for non-manifold models has been developed for computer-aided design models imported from standard for the exchange of product files. After tessellation, several polyhedral subdomains form a nonmanifold polyhedron. To plan the trajectories of the laser beam, adaptive slicing and global 3D hatching processes as well as a “welding” process (for joining subdomains of different dimensionality) have been combined. Finally, two nonmanifold microstructures are fabricated according to the proposed model preparation and processing scheme.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 2

A schematic view of the TPP micromanufacturing process and its major components

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Figure 3

Schematic diagram of the TPP microfabrication system

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Figure 4

Overpolymerization. (a) The voxel distribution in ultrathin layers (different colors present voxels in different layers). (b) Displacement of polymerized parts occurs when an energy threshold is reached and bubbles are produced. (c) A SEM image of a microstair fabricated by TPP shows two deformation places caused by overpolymerization.

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Figure 5

Schematic diagram of voxel overlap ratio and layer thickness

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Figure 6

Schematic diagram of wall thickness or wire section

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Figure 7

Process flow of the proposed extended-LM process for TPP microfabrication

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Figure 8

Comparison between a standard tessellation process ((a) and (b)) and the proposed one ((c) and (d)). (a) An input model having disconnected subdomains (surface, volume, and wire). (b) Polyhedron produced after applying a standard tessellating process. (c) Three subdomains S1, S2, S3 produced after applying the proposed tessellation process. (d) The tessellation of each edge and the mesh of each face coincide with one polyedge and one partition, respectively.

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Figure 9

The global structure for decomposing the microstructure in accordance with three path planning strategies

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Figure 10

Adaptive slicing process

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Figure 11

Global 3D hatching process

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Figure 12

Types of welding configurations: ((a)–(d)) welding at a connection between adjacent surface subdomains. (a) Two subdomains in the polyhedron. (b) Partitions (P1–P10, P7–P10 not shown) and their polyhedron faces. (c) Specify two partition groups (1 P4 and P5 and 2 P6) to obtain the shared edges. Then, apply two intersection operators (I1 and I2) to create a weld line. (d) The result. (e) Welding at a wire connected to other subdomains.

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Figure 13

A nonmanifold microstructure corresponding to an assembly and incorporating kinematics functions. (a) The B-Rep model. (b) The polyhedral model after tessellating. The dotted red/black yellow/black polylines are the polyedges of the closed surfaces and open surfaces, respectively. Each partition is presented as a different color. (c) The merged partitions after applying specific geometric constraints. (d) The scanning paths of laser beam. (e) SEM image of the microstructure. (f) The comparison of fabricating times between SSM, ASP, and TSM. (g) The fabricating time based on TSM estimated with various critical slicing angles.

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Figure 14

A nonmanifold microstructure incorporating a membrane. (a) The shaded view of polyhedral model after tessellation. (b) Tessellation consistence at nonmanifold edges. (c) The scanning paths of laser beam. (d) SEM image of the microstructure.

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Figure 1

Examples of digital models of microproducts

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