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Technical Briefs

CPM2: A Core Model for Product Data

[+] Author and Article Information
Steven J. Fenves

 Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213;Guest Researcher Manufacturing Systems Integration Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8263sfenves@cme.nist.gov

Sebti Foufou

LE2i Laboratory, University of Burgundy, B.P. 47870, 21078 Dijon, France; Guest Researcher Manufacturing Systems Integration Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8263sfoufou@bourgogne.fr

Conrad Bock

Manufacturing Systems Integration Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8263cbock@cme.nist.gov

Ram D. Sriram

Manufacturing Systems Integration Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8263sriram@cme.nist.gov

For clarity, only the subArtifact/subArtifactOf containment hierarchy of Artifact is labeled in Fig. 1.

In some application domains, features may have independent behaviors; in such cases, the distinction between Feature and Artifact disappears and Feature can be eliminated as a distinct class and simply be subsumed into the Artifact containment hierarchy.

The semantics of the term type used in this paper differs from that of the term “data type” commonly used in computer science data structure definitions. The use of the term type here is consistent with the defintion used in the FRISCO report: “Type (Synonym: Category): A type of things is a specific characterisation (e.g. a predicate) applying to all things of that type” (15)

The NIST Design Repository (16), using a product model closely based on CPM, contains some fairly substantial designs, such as the complete record of the Charters of Freedom enclosures built at NIST (17).

J. Comput. Inf. Sci. Eng 8(1), 014501 (Feb 28, 2008) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2830842 History: Received October 12, 2005; Revised July 01, 2007; Published February 28, 2008

The initial core product model (CPM), developed at NIST for the support of in-house research projects, has been extended to create CPM2, intended to support a broad range of information relevant to product lifecycle management. CPM2 is a generic, abstract model with generic semantics. CPM2 gives equal status to three aspects of a product or artifact: its function, its form, and its behavior. Thus, CPM2 can support functional reasoning about a product in the conceptual stages of design, the recording and the modeling of its behavior in the postdesign stages as well as the “traditional” design phases. Three levels of CPM2 models, de-noted as the conceptual, intermediate, and implementation models, are described. Extensions of the initial CPM are briefly pre-sented. The facilities in CPM2 for building experimental intermediate systems are demonstrated and a short illustrative example is given. The full practical evaluation of CPM2 will require the development and use of implementation models.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

UML class diagram of the CPM

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

CPM2 object classes

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Figure 3

Relationships between object classes

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

A CPM2 instance with attributes and values

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Partial CPM2 instance diagram for the PLS

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