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Research Papers

A Matchmaking Methodology for Supply Chain Deployment in Distributed Manufacturing Environments

[+] Author and Article Information
Farhad Ameri

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109amerif@umich.edu

Debasish Dutta

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109dutta@umich.edu

Online market for chemical industry (http://www.chemconnect.com).

Online market for automotive industry (http://www.covisint.com).

Standard Upper Ontology Working Group (http://suo.ieee.or).

Semantic Web Services (http://www.daml.org/services).

http://mfg.com

J. Comput. Inf. Sci. Eng 8(1), 011002 (Feb 14, 2008) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2830849 History: Received December 05, 2006; Revised August 13, 2007; Published February 14, 2008

In modern manufacturing era, supply chains are increasingly becoming global and agile. To build agile global supply chains, companies first need to have access to a large supply base and secondly need an efficient mechanism for cost-effective and rapid location, evaluation, and selection of suppliers. This work introduces a matchmaking algorithm for connecting buyers and sellers of manufacturing services based on their semantic similarities in terms of manufacturing capabilities. The proposed matchmaking algorithm operates over Manufacturing Service Description Language (MSDL), an ontology for formal representation of manufacturing services. Since MSDL descriptions can be represented as directed labeled trees, a tree matching approach is implemented in this work.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 2

Subclasses of service in MSDL

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Figure 5

Core classes of MSDL

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Figure 6

Definition of the end milling process in MSDL

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Figure 7

The supplier subgraph and service subgraph are the major components of advertisement and query graphs

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Figure 8

The query graph (Gq)

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Figure 9

The advertisement graph (Ga)

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Figure 10

DL representation of sample advertisement (a) and query (b)

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Figure 11

Process definitions in advertisement and query

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Figure 12

OWL code for an instance of material class in MSDL

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Figure 13

When MRB is less than MRA, the similarity between A and B declines linearly as MRB decreases

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Figure 14

(a) Graph-based method compared with human judgment. (b) Vector-based method compared with human judgment.

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Figure 4

OWL source codes for the association of any instance of the MfgService class to exactly one instance of process class

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Figure 3

Subclasses of the MfgCapability class, which are used for describing machining capabilities of a service

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Figure 1

Relationship between supplier, service, and resource in MSDL

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