0
TECHNICAL PAPERS

3D Digitizing Strategy Planning Approach Based on a CAD Model

[+] Author and Article Information
William Derigent

CRAN, Research Center for Automatic Control of Nancy, CNRS UMR 7039, Université Henri Poincaré, Nancy I, Faculté des Sciences, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex, Francederigent@cran.uhp-nancy.fr

Emilie Chapotot, Gabriel Ris

CRAN, Research Center for Automatic Control of Nancy, CNRS UMR 7039, Université Henri Poincaré, Nancy I, Faculté des Sciences, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex, France

Sébastien Remy

ICD, Charles Delaunay Institute, Université de Technologie de Troyes, 12, rue Marie Curie, BP 2060, 10010 Troyes Cedex, France

Alain Bernard

IRCCyN, Communication and Cybernetic Research Institute of Nantes, CNRS UMR 6597, Centrale Nantes, 1 rue de la Noë, BP 92101, 44321 Nantes Cedex 3, France

J. Comput. Inf. Sci. Eng 7(1), 10-19 (Jul 28, 2006) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2410023 History: Received September 14, 2005; Revised July 28, 2006

The objective of this paper is to describe a new method to determine the three-dimensional (3D) digitizing strategy for a computer aided design (CAD) known mechanical part by using a plane laser sensor. The Research Centre for Automatic control in Nancy, France has initiated a project to create an automatic 3D digitizing system. Previous papers focused on the visibility determinations using spherical geometry in a three axis environment. Here, the latest developments are presented. They enable one to improve this approach by taking into account a five axis environment. Using a new approach based on the Minkovsky operations to calculate the visibility of the different face of the B-Rep model of the part, the minimum set of directions required to entirely digitize the part is computed.

Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

The Zephyr sensor

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Local visibility cone of a planar face (2D view)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

The obtained visibility cones

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Obtention of the occulting cone

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Projection of local accessibility and facet on the plane

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Circular visibility map

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

2D map computation

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Common orientations for F1 and F2

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

An example with hollow box

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Shadow and occultation phenomena

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Directions of the laser and the camera and their associated meridian

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Directions of the camera for a given direction of the laser on the map

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Test of the laser directions

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Determination of the minimum set of digitizing orientations (MSD)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 15

The CAD model (left) in divided into two sub-CAD models (right)

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In