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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Constraint-Based Techniques to Support Collaborative Design

[+] Author and Article Information
R. Joan-Arinyo, A. Soto-Riera, S. Vila-Marta

Escola Tècnica Superior d’Enginyeria Industrial,  Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 8a, E-08028 Barcelona, Spain

J. Comput. Inf. Sci. Eng 6(2), 139-148 (Sep 16, 2005) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2190236 History: Received December 22, 2004; Revised September 16, 2005

We develop a framework to support collaborative constraint-based geometric design systems with multiple views for concurrent engineering. The framework is based on a conceptual architecture with a master view and several client views with a two-way flow of information between the master and client views. The tools in the framework are used to open a new application’s view and to maintain consistency when one of the applications changes its view by editing it and when either the master view or one of the other views must be updated. A simple case study illustrates how the tools in the framework work.

Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 11

The greedy algorithm for subset systems

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Figure 12

The new client view opened from the master view

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Figure 13

The new client view with added constraints

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Figure 14

The well-constrained new client view

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Figure 15

The new client view after updating the values of parameters h3 and a2

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Figure 16

The master view after synchronization with the client view

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Figure 17

Tree decomposition of the graph on the left-hand side of Fig. 8.

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Figure 18

Classification of geometric constraint graphs according to well-constraintness and the set of tree decomposable graphs

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Figure 19

Free completion algorithm for graph G=(V,E)

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Figure 20

Distribution of runs where more edges in Ĝ could be added to G

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Figure 10

Two conditional completions of G from Ĝ in Fig. 9. Left panel: under-constrained. Right panel: well-constrained with maximum weight.

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Figure 9

Geometric constraint graphs G (left) and Ĝ (right)

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Figure 8

An under-constrained graph and two different possible completions

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Figure 7

A master invariant example

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Figure 6

A work pattern using views

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Figure 5

Master view architecture with client views

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Figure 4

Constraint graph associated to the model in Fig. 3

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Figure 3

A geometric constraint-based model

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Figure 2

Distinct realizations of the abstract geometric constraint problem of Fig. 1. The assignment to parameter h1 is 160 in the first row and 100 in the second row.

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Figure 1

An abstract geometric constraint problem

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