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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Automation of Process Planning for Boring of Turned Components With Arbitrary Internal Geometry From a Semi-Finished Stock

[+] Author and Article Information
V. V. Satish K Motipalli

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66502satish@ksu.edu

Prakash Krishnaswami

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66502prakash@ksu.edu

J. Comput. Inf. Sci. Eng 6(1), 49-59 (May 31, 2005) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2173670 History: Revised May 31, 2005; Received December 19, 2005

This paper describes a novel method for automated process planning for boring of turned components with arbitrary internal geometry from a semi-finished stock. Earlier work has been reported on process planning for boring of components with monotonic internal geometry made from bar stock. This paper addresses the more general problem of process planning of parts with nonmonotonic internal geometry from arbitrary given the initial geometry, i.e., from a casting or from a semi-finished stock. With the algorithms developed, we are able to achieve full automation of all aspects of the process plan, including operations sequencing, parameter selection, numerical control (NC) code generation, etc. Thus, it becomes possible to go from design to NC code in a fully automated fashion. In the present work we focus on a tightly defined part family, which results in very simple but robust automation algorithms. This is in contrast to much of the reported work on automated process planning, which generally targets broad part families, leading to complex algorithms that fall short of complete design-to-NC automation.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 3

(a) General boring tool with cutting point in lead; and (b) equivalent right hand turning tool

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Figure 4

(a) Final desired part; (b) initial part; (c) initial machining polygons from bar stock; (d) machining polygons superposed on initial part; and (e) HLOs identified

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Figure 5

(a) Trapezoid selected for interference checks; (b) boring tool placed at four corners of the trapezoid; (c) boring tool with points defining the geometry; and (d) boring tool with its tool line segments defining the geometry

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Figure 12

Holding length selection

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Figure 13

Holding length selection

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Figure 14

Interaction between algorithms developed for internal process planning for a semi-finished stock

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Figure 2

(a) Part with final internal features; (b) initial semi-finished stock; (c) equivalent external features from the final part; (d) equivalent external features from the initial part; (e) complementary final part; and (f) complementary initial part

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Figure 1

(a) Approximation of concave profile by cords; and (b) approximation of convex profile by tangents

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Figure 10

Initial part super-imposed on the final part with HLOs highlighted

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Figure 9

(a) Specification drawing for final part; and (b) specification drawing for initial part

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Figure 8

Initial part super-imposed on the final and the HLOs highlighted

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Figure 7

(a) Specification drawing of final part; and (b) specification drawing of initial part

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Figure 6

(a) Part with initial super imposed on final; (b) first trapezoid identified; (c) updated part after removal of first trapezoid; (d) second trapezoid identified; (e) updated part after removal of second trapezoid; (f) third and fourth trapezoids identified; and (g) final part

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